Cambridge Centre for the study of Western Esotericism

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Correspondences: an online Journal for the Academic Study of Western Esotericism

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Correspondences. An online Journal for the Academic Study of Western Esotericism.

Call for papers. Deadline: feb. 28, 2013.

About

Correspondences seeks to create a public academic forum devoted to discussion and exposition of issues and currents in the field commonly known as ‘Western Esotericism.’ The editors acknowledge that the use of “Western esotericism” as an umbrella term for a widely variant field of alternate scientific and religious ideas is problematic. Thus, articles related to esoteric currents from other global cultural centers may be accepted if a connection to “alternative” currents in “western culture” is implicitly established.

The following list of areas of study is provided for clarification: Alchemy, Anthroposophy, Astrology, Eco-spirituality, Esoteric art, literature, and music, Freemasonry, Geomancy, Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Illuminism, Initiatory secret societies, Kabbalah, Magic, Mesmerism, Mysticism, Naturphilosophie, Neo-paganism, New Age, Occultism, Occulture, Paracelsianism, Rosicrucianism, Satanism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, Traditionalism, Ufology, Witchcraft.

Correspondences encourages submissions from a variety of methodological and disciplinary approaches, such as: History of Religions; Sociology; Art History; Philosophy; History of Science; Literature; ; and Cultural Studies, just to name a few.

Editors

Jimmy Elwing, rMA student, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Aren Roukema, rMA student, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Editorial Board

Egil Asprem, MA, Researcher, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Dr. Henrik Bogdan, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Dr. Juan Pablo Bubello, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Dr. Dylan Burns, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Dr. Peter Forshaw, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Christian Giudice, PhD student, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Dr. Amy Hale, St. Petersburg College, United States.

Prof. Boaz Huss, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.

Prof. Birgit Menzel, Universität Mainz, Germany.

More Information, please contact us at

submissions@correspondencesjournal.com

URL: http://correspondencesjournal.com/

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Conference University of Aberdeen: SECOND SIGHT AND PROPHECY

Conference University of Aberdeen

14-16 June 2013

 

Conference organised by the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy, and the Elphinstone Institute at the University of Aberdeen; sponsored by the Folklore Society

This interdisciplinary conference welcomes participants from a range of academic disciplines including History, Folklore, Anthropology, Divinity and Sociology whose research interests cover a wide range of topics exploring varying methods used by different cultures (both now and in the past) to look into the future and the rationale for so doing. The future has always held a fascination for humankind especially in times of tribulation and this is worthy of academic discussion in light of the changes affecting so many of us in our current global context. The role in culture of seers and prophets, by whatever name they are known, and the use of rituals, drugs and sacred sites, etc. will be examined.

Abstracts of 300 words are invited on any of the following or related topics.

These should be submitted by 15 November 2012 to the conference convenor, Dr Alex Sutherland, History Department, University of Aberdeen;

 a.m.sutherland@abdn.ac.uk mailto:a.m.sutherland@abdn.ac.uk

Papers might address:

Astrology and its rationale(s) for predicting the future.

Biblical prophecy as depicted in the arts.

Divination in any form.

English attitudes to second sight.

Healing wells.

How modern scientists have appropriated the persona of the prophet or visionary seer.

Landscape and prophecy in art.

Old Norse and later Scandinavian sources on prophecy.

Popular Catholic belief in prophecy before and after the Reformation.

Prophecy in Native American tribes.

Prophetic utterances by the courts, commoners, and the church.

Reading the future in the landscape of settlements.

Renaissance science and astrology.

Sami shamanism.

Second sight and prophecy in Scottish Gaeldom.

Second sight and prophecy in the Viking world.

Second sight in Gaelic traditions as they survived and evolved in Nova Scotian communities.

Seers and seeresses in medieval Icelandic saga literature.

The early Islamic world & its connections with astrology.

The role of prophecies, visions and dreams in poetry and allegorical tales.

The role of prophecy in the origins of Islam, in the pre-Islamic Arabian environment

The use of sites, dreams and ancestors for prophecies by indigenous peoples.

Visual and verbal imagery of natural objects as coded language for the use of entheogens to attain divine / prophetic knowledge.

Welsh prophetic poetry.

When prophecy fails.

Conference: ASTROLOGY IN TIME AND PLACE

UNIVERSITY OF WALES TRINITY SAINT DAVID

SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY, HISTORY AND ANTHROPOLOGY

THE SOPHIA CENTRE

Tenth AnnualConference

 

ASTROLOGY IN TIME AND PLACE

Saturday 23-Sunday 24 June 2012

Bath Royal Literary and ScientificInstitute, 16-19 Queen Square, Bath BA1 2HN

http://www.historyofastrology.org.uk/conferences/TimeAndPlace/index.html

 

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

SATURDAY 24 JUNE

8.30     Registration and Refreshments

9.20     Welcome

9.30     Bernadette Brady (University of Wales Trinity Saint David)

Aristotle’s idea of ‘place’ within contemporary astrology.

10.00               Gustav-Adolf Schoener (Leibniz University ofHanover)

The Difference between Methods of Natural Sciences and Methods of Religious Studies on Modern Astrology.

10.30   Johann Hasler (Departamento deMúsica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia)

The sounding zodiacs in Westernmusical theory: an overview of proposals for musical interpretation ofastrological data from Ptolemy to the late 20th century.

 

11.00   TEA AND COFFEE

 

11.30   Charles Burnett

(Professor of the History of Islamic Influences at the Warburg Institute of the University of London)

Johannes Borotin as student and teacher of the science of the stars in fifteenth-century Prague.

12.30   LUNCH (OWN ARRANGEMENTS)

2.00     David Pankenier (Department of Modern Languages & Literature,Lehigh University)

On Chinese Astrology’s Impermeability to Western Influences.

3.00     Kristina Buhrman (University of Southern California)

Ptolemy and Sima Qian in 11thCentury Japan:Combining Disparate Astrologies in Practice.

 

3.30     TEA AND COFFEE

 

4.00     Ulla Koch (Carsten NiebuhrInstitute, University of Copenhagen)

The Meaning of Time: Calendar Divination.

4.30     Michael Grofe (Maya Exploration Centre)

Eternity in an Hour: the astronomical symbolism of the Era as the Maya agricultural year.

5.00     Christel Mattheeuws (Department of Anthropology, University of Aberdeen)

The Journey of Calendars, Wind and Life in the Indian Ocean.

 

SUNDAY 25 JUNE

9.30     Micah Ross and DorianGieseler Greenbaum (Kyōto Sangyō University; University of WalesTrinity Saint David)

Various renderings of pinaxin Greek and Demotic in the Medînet Mâdi ostraca.

10.00   Helen R. Jacobus (University College London)

The Zodiac Calendar in the Dead Sea Scrolls (4Q318) in relation to Babylonian Horoscopes.

10.30    David W. Kim (University of Edinburgh)

A Sethian Iconography: The Astrology of Tchacos Judas.

 

11.00   TEA AND COFFEE

 

11.30   Micah Ross (Kyōto Sangyō University)

A Study in the Early Iconography of Gemini.

12.00   Matthew Kosuta (College of Religious Studies, Mahidol University, Thailand)

The relationship between Theravada Buddhism and astrology with an emphasis on the modern period and Thailand.

 

12.30   LUNCH

 

2.00     Mario Friscia (University of  LaSapienza, Rome)

Astrology and its ritual applications:Propitiation of the planet Saturn within the Sun temple at Suriyanar Koyil (Tamil Nadu, India). A case-study from contemporary Tamil Shaivism.

2.30     Audrius Benorius (Director of the Center of Oriental Studies,Vilnius University, Lithuania)

Transformations of theSocial and Religious Status  of the Indian Astrologer at the Royal Court.

3.00     Michael York (Former Professor of Cultural Astronomy and Astrology, Bath Spa University)

Religion versus Science: Science versus Religion:Whither Astrology: Whithersoever?

4.00     CLOSE

 

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

May 22, 2012 at 2:07 pm

Call for Abstracts: A ‘SUPERNATURAL’ HISTORY OF CENTRAL EUROPE – 1870 – PRESENT

Call for Abstracts: “A ‘Supernatural’ History of Central Europe, 1870-present”

Editors: Eric Kurlander (Stetson U.) and Monica Black (U. of Tenn., Knoxville)

Deadline: August 1, 2012

Despite the ostensible “disenchantment of the world” proclaimed by Max Weber at the beginning of the twentieth century, Central Europe has a rich modern history of occultism, folklore, paganism, and popular religion. Yet the “supernatural history” of this ethno- culturally diverse region, extending from the Rhine and Baltic in the North and West to the Vistula and Danube in the South and East, has yet to be written. To be sure, the last twenty years have witnessed a renaissance of interest in Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish religious practice since the late-nineteenth century. With the exception a few excellent monographs on occultism and parapsychology, however, historians have been slow to investigate less conventional aspects of the “supernatural” in Modern Central Europe.

We seek abstracts from scholars interested in exploring the new spiritualities, unique metaphysical experiences and practices, and novel explanations of the world that stood somewhere between natural scientific verifiability and the shopworn truths of traditional religion, and which flourished across Central Europe in the wake of the Second Industrial Revolution. We are keen to see submissions that integrate social, political, and cultural history with “supernatural” thinking and practice, broadly conceived. We are especially interested in submissions that will extend their analysis and explorations beyond national boundaries, connecting people, ideas, experiences, and movements interculturally and transnationally.

Obviously, profound complexities inhere in the term “supernatural”—and no less so in terms like “popular religion,” let alone “superstition.” All of these terms bristle with invidious distinctions and reifications imposed by those seeking to draw sharp contrasts between “orthodox” and “heterogeneous” manifestations of religion and between “science” and “popular belief”—which for our purposes might refer to various methods of explaining, knowing, and experiencing the world that somehow draw on the numinous or the metaphysical. Not only has the presence and broad scope of such practices and ideas not yet been fully explored, but they have also not been properly integrated into larger histories of Central European culture, society, and politics—despite the fact that they have from time to time been the cause of considerable friction.

By bringing together scholars from German, Austrian, Hapsburg, and Slavic Studies, we hope to address questions central to the study of Central European politics, culture, and identity in new ways. What meanings can we assign to the renewal of interest in occultism, “pseudo-science,” and folklore studies in the decades around the fin-de-siècle? How does the waxing or waning of these fields relate to questions of war and peace, revolution and reaction, crisis and stability? How have differences between “science” and “pseudo-science” been articulated in various moments and why? How did folklore, occultism, “pseudo-science” and other “supernatural” practices function as alternatives to organized religion at various moments in the Central European past? How was a fascination with the “supernatural” reflected in popular culture and the arts from the nineteenth century to today? What roles have popular superstition and everyday rituals played in Central European attempts to negotiate the trials of the twentieth century? What role did such rituals––“political religion” or otherwise––play in the legitimization of fascism, communism, and other forms of authoritarian politics before and after 1945? What influence did “supernatural” ideas and practices have in generating policies of ethnic cleansing, eugenics, and imperialism, or how can they been seen as a response to those policies? What were the differences East and West of the Iron Curtain after 1945? What are the implications in terms of class, gender, identity, and ethnicity?

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

Occultism

Pseudo-science” and parapsychology

Séances, spirit media, and communication with the dead

Dowsing

Faith healing

Astrology

Palm reading

Clairvoyance and prophecy

Ghost stories and apparitions

Witchcraft

Homeopathy

New Age

Exorcism

Vampires, werewolves and other monsters

Pagan” religions

The horror genre, science fiction, and “fantastic” in film, art, and literature

If you are interested in contributing an abstract of not more than 500 words for consideration, please send it, along with your CV, to Monica Black (mblack9@utk.edu) and Eric Kurlander (ekurland@stetson.edu) by AUGUST 1, 2012.

THE IMAGINAL COSMOS: Community Arts and Education short course

 

THE IMAGINAL COSMOS

Community Arts and Education short course

Tutors: Angela Voss and Geoffrey Cornelius

Date: Thursday 2 February

(8 sessions, 10.30am – 1pm)

Nearly everyone has a ‘sixth sense’ that finds meaning in life events apart from rational explanations, and yet this intuitive experience has no place in our institutions of learning or science. This has not always been the case, and in this 10 week course you will investigate the history and practices of this sixth sense.

Our exploration ranges from psychic communication and spiritualism to symbolic interpretation in popular forms of divination such as astrology, I Ching and Tarot. What is the role of imagination, and in what way is this knowledge ‘real’? Does it suggest an intelligent Cosmos?

Starting with the Western tradition coming down to us through Plato, we follow the Renaissance rebirth of ancient wisdom through to contemporary New Age spirituality. Adopting the metaphor of the two brain hemispheres and their different orientations towards reality, we look at the bridge between rational and non-rational knowledge, allowing intuitive and creative insights to inform our experience.

Cost: £85 (excluding lunch)

This event is open to the public.

Venue: Canterbury Christ Church University Campus,

Time: 10:30

Contact: April Doyle (email)

Telephone: 01227 86345

ASE: ESOTERICISM RELIGION & CULTURE

 

  

Association for the Study of Esotericism Fourth International Conference

Call for Papers: Esotericism, Religion, and Culture University of California,

Davis July 19-22, 2012

PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE

The Association for the Study of Esotericism (ASE) is seeking paper and panel proposals for its fourth International North American Conference on Esotericism to be held at the University of California, Davis. Because of a scheduling conflict, we have had to change conference dates to July 19-22, 2012.

We are seeking proposals on topics in Western Esotericism, particularly related to themes exploring the relationships between esotericism, religion, and culture. Papers may focus on any one of these topics, or on a specific conjunction of topics, especially as it relates to esotericism, and we encourage papers that feature intellectual history or history of ideas. We invite proposals on magic, alchemy, astrology, ritual practice, mysticism, spiritualism, occultism, hermeticism, neo-paganism, contemporary esoteric movements and teachers, Asian influences on Western traditions, and other related topics.

In addition to the broad theme of culture-which includes literature, art, philosophy, and drama, as well as religion-we would like to feature a methodological discussion (Esotericism Across the Disciplines). We also are interested in panels specifically on mysticism. ASE regards esotericism as an interdisciplinary field of research and we invite scholars from all disciplines to share their research and writings in support of a cross-fertilization of perspectives. We welcome scholars from a wide range of areas, including anthropology, American studies, art history, history, intellectual history, religious studies, literature, philosophy, psychology, medieval studies, sociology-the full range of academic disciplines and fields.. In order to encourage graduate study in the field, we will offer a modest prize for the best graduate student paper presented.

Because of the schedule change for the conference dates, now July 19-22, our extended deadline for panel or paper proposal submission is 15 February 2012.

If you wish to submit a paper proposal or a thematically focused panel proposal (with three presenters and short descriptions

included) for review and possible presentation at the conference, please send it by regular email to ASE2012Conference@gmail.com

No attachments, please: simply copy and paste your abstract into plain text email. Individual abstracts should be limited to one or two paragraphs, and must indicate academic affiliation and/or other academic qualifications. Independent scholars are welcome to submit proposals. Please note that our previous conference was at maximum capacity, so it is best to submit your proposal sooner rather than later. We hope to post a preliminary list of accepted proposals early in 2012. Possible venues for the publication of conference papers include the book series Studies in Esotericism (this will be the fourth volume in the series).

For more information on the ASE, see our website at http://www.aseweb.org Additional announcements will be forthcoming on the 2012 ASE conference.

Recent Academic Research on Astrology: THE 9TH HOUSE

www.the9thhouse.org


THE 9TH HOUSE

Recent Academic Research

on Astrology

Recent years have seen a flowering of academic research on astrology, or topics related to astrology, unprecedented in the last three hundred years. This website exists in order to make as much as possible of this work available.

It will be limited to:

Ph.D. or M.Phil. theses from accredited universities.

Selected M.A. dissertations from accredited universities.

Work in English.

Work in either the humanities or social sciences. (Research attempting to locate astrology as effects with causes determinable by the physical sciences is a sufficiently different enterprise to belong somewhere else.)

Short notices about forthcoming books based on, or incorporating, theses or dissertations.

All Ph.D./ M.Phil. theses and short notices that are offered by their authors will be accepted that conform, in the Editor’s opinion, to the above criteria. Regarding M.A. dissertations, the final decision of what to include rests with myself, as the site’s editor.

Notices of Forthcoming Work by

Nicholas Campion

Geoffrey Cornelius

Patrick Curry

Dorian Gieseler Greenbaum

Liz Greene

Angela Voss

Finally, although it has no direct involvement with this website, the Sophia Trust deserves thanks for making much of this research possible through its generous institutional support at various British universities.

(Dr) Patrick Curry

info@the9thhouse.org

© The 9th House | email: info@the9thhouse.org

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