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Shakespeare and the Mysteries: Conference: Shakespearean Authorship Trust & Brunel University

Shakeskes

Sunday 18 November 2012

The Shakespearean Authorship Trust,

in collaboration with Brunel University, presents

Shakespeare and the Mysteries The are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy

What are the implications for the Authorship Question of Shakespeare’s profound knowledge of Renaissance Neoplatonic and Hermetic traditions? These are present not only in passing allusions but also in the deep structure of his dramas, open to interpretation as allegories of initiation, transformation and regeneration.

http://www.shakespeareanauthorshiptrust.org.uk/pages/conf.htm

Shakeskes

Speakers:

Ros Barber (The Marlowe Papers)

Julia Cleave (Trustee of the SAT)

Peter Dawkins (The Shakespeare Enigma)

Mark Rylance (Chairman of the SAT)

Susan Sheridan (The Merry Wife of Wilton)

Earl Showerman (President of the Shakespeare Fellowship)

Claire van Kampen (Shakespeare’s Globe Special Advisor on Early Modern Music)

Shakeskes

Date: Sunday 18 November 2012

Time: 11:00 – 18:00 (Tea and coffee available from 10:30) Venue: Shakespeare’s Globe, The Sackler Studios*, on the corner of Bear Gardens and Park Street, Bankside, London, SE1.

Tickets: £35 (including tea and coffee) Booking: Shakespeare’s Globe

Sunday

Box Office Booking opens: 22 October**

*Note change of venue in 2012 due to building of the new indoor Jacobean theatre at the Globe.

**Early booking advised as places are limited

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Draft Programme Schedule

Shak

10:30 Arrivals & Coffee

Shak

11:00 Introduction by Mark Rylance

Shakespeare’s Globe as Sacred Theatre and Cosmic Stage

Shak

11:30 Peter Dawkins

The Lost Word and Swan Song: Rosicrucian and Baconian Themes in Shakespeare’s comedies and romances.

Sunday

12:15 Julia Cleave

Initiations, Transmutations and Resurrection Fables: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Antony & Cleopatra and All’s Well that Ends Well

Sunday

13:00 Lunch

Sunday

14:15 Earl Showerman

Shakespeare’s Physic: Hermetic and Alchemical Magic in The Winter’s Tale, Pericles and All’s Well that Ends Well.

Sunday

15:00 Susan Sheridan

Shaking the Spear: The Hermetic interests of the Sidney/Pembroke Circle with special reference to Cymbeline.

Sunday

15:35 Ros Barber

Death’s A Great Disguiser: Resurrecting Shakespeare.

Shak

16:15 Tea & Cake

Shak

 

16:45 Claire van Kampen

Shakespeare & Divine Proportion: The Tempest & the Music of the Spheres

Shak

17:30 Forum/Q&A

Shak

18:00 Ends

 

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Call for papers: Societas Magica sessions IMC Kalamazoo

Societas Magica

Call for papers Societas Magica sessions IMC Kalamazoo

Sat Jul 7, 2012 7:34 pm (PDT)

The Societas Magica invites abstracts for four sessions to be held at

the next International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo, MI, 9-13

May 2013. The four sponsored sessions are:

Session I – Astrology and Magic (co-sponsored with the Research Group on

Manuscript Evidence)

Contact: Dr. David Porreca (University of Waterloo) dporreca@uwaterloo.ca

Session II – Magic, Material Culture and Technology (co-sponsored with

the Research Group on Manuscript Evidence)

Contact: László Sándor Chardonnens (Radboud University Nijmegen)

s.chardonnens@let.ru.nl

Session III – Water as Symbol, Sign and Trial: Aquatic Semantics in the

Middle Ages (co-sponsored with the Reseach Group on Manuscript Evidence)

Contact: Mihai-D. Grigore (University of Erfurt) grigoremihai@gmx.de

Session IV – Magical Practices in Pre-Modern China

Contact: Dimitri Drettas (Collège de France) hedansi@yahoo.fr

If you have material suitable to one of these topics, please send an

abstract (ca. 250 words) electronically to the contact person listed for

that session by 15 September 2012 along with the Participant Information

Form.

More detailed information about the sessions and a link to the

participant information form may be found at www.societasmagica.org

48TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

48TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

CFP: Technical Communication in the Middle Ages

48th International Congress on Medieval Studies

May 9-12, 2013

Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo MI

Scholars have long recognized Chaucer’s “Treatise on the Astrolabe” as an early technical document, yet few  similar medieval texts have been discussed as specimens of  technical communication. This session seeks to consider  the traditions and conventions of medieval technical  communication, as well as the connections between medieval and contemporary technical writing.

Possible texts for  consideration might include (but are not limited to)

penitential and conduct manuals,

monastic rules,

business correspondence,

medical treatises,

scientific and pseudo-scientific manuals (including alchemical and astrological ones),

cookery books,

law codes,

government and military documents.

Papers should consider the texts as technical communication, but may focus either on any aspect, including writing, layout, design, etc. 

Please submit abstracts of about 300 words to

Wendy Hennequin:  whennequin@tnstate.edu

by September 15, 2012.

MAPPING THE OCCULT CITY: EXPLORING MAGICK AND ESOTERICISM IN THE URBAN UTOPIA

Call For Papers, Presentations, Workshops, Rituals and Performances

Mapping the Occult City: Exploring Magick and Esotericism in the Urban Utopia

A pre-conference for the Annual Meeting of the

American Academy of Religions in Chicago, 

Friday November 16, 2012,

presented by Phoenix Rising Academy and DePaul University.

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Description:

In his classic essay, “Walking in the City,” ethnologist and historian Michel de Certeau distinguished between the “exaltation of a scopic and gnostic drive” that comes from viewing the city from a high vantage point and the quotidian negotiations of the walker at street level, who creates his or her own map, takes shortcuts and resists the strategies of typical urban planning. One perspective is totalizing and distancing, constructing an illusory, unified view of the metropolis, while the other seeks out hidden avenues of knowledge and intersections of stories, myths, and happenings. The occultist tends to shift between both views, sometimes spinning grand narratives of the city as a New Atlantis, a utopian civilization of knowledge and wonder, other times imagining a secret world of dark mysteries, unknown to most passersby, that lay just beyond the twilight of the streetlamps. Many esotericists, conspiracy theorists, and urban fantasy authors have speculated on the occult meaning of symbols, monuments, and architecture in major cities, from Cleopatra’s Needle in London to the Washington Monument in Washington D.C. Or they see powerful sigils in the neon signs, building facades and billboards. Some speak of urban ley lines and “energy centers” that bubble with occult power ready to be tapped into by those with the right sense and ability. These energy centers are focused on geometric street patterns or the lines created by the placement of sacred sites in the city, such as churches, temples, and cemeteries. Others speak of haunted places, charged with story and legend, often full of the sense of violence, trauma and the urgency of events that occurred there.

Historically, cities have been home to countless esoteric groups who have met, planned, and conducted ritual within the towering buildings that glitter the metropolitan skyline. For instance,  Chicago, the location of this year’s AAR conference, was once the home of the 32 floor Masonic Building, owned by the Illinois Freemasons, and the tallest building in the world in 1892. Prominent figures in the esoteric world have spoken, performed and offered their wisdom to the masses through the many salons, lectures, performances, congregations, conferences, and world’s fairs that have been either publicly advertised or available only to those with the right password and invitation.

Cities are where the ideas of Western esotericism spread to the masses through these public events and the many urban publishing houses. Cities are also home to public events and happenings that connect the esoteric, the theatrical and the political world through protest and public actions and happenings, such as the W.I.T.C.H. protests at Chicago’s Federal Building on Halloween 1969. Finally, cities are centers of diversity and diaspora and often become hothouses for the development of hybrid traditions based on immigrant cultures, such as Santeria and Vodun.

For scholars of magick and esotericism, cities like Chicago can offer up rich resources for tracking group activities and events through library archives and public records. Understanding occult life in the city, in both its historical and contemporary contexts, is crucial in mapping the proliferation of ideas and connections between practitioners and traditions. Popular practical texts have addressed how the practice of magick changes in an urban setting, especially when the magician or witch must adapt a nature-centered practice to a city-based practice. Investigating esoteric actions in the city can reveal the ways in which the practitioner is caught up and complicit with strategic structures of power while also offering possibilities for the occultist to resist those structures through the kind of tactical, magical  moves described by de Certeau. As the Occupy movement and other political protests proliferate, especially in America’s election year, what are the possibilities for harnessing and directing the energy of the occult city?

Phoenix Rising Academy would like to explore these intersections of the esoteric and the urban, focusing on the city as a locus for power and knowledge, both hidden and revealed. Are cities oppressive entities that stifle creative and esoteric drives or do they hold in their structures the  otential for powerful action? To this end, we invite scholars and practitioners to submit proposals for papers, presentations, rituals and performances that address these questions pertaining to the occult city. Though our focus is primarily on American cities, particularly Chicago, we welcome explorations in other prominent global metropolitan centers.

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Structure:

For this pre-conference, we plan on creating 2-3 panels of papers,

presentations, performances, rituals, workshops, roundtables, or

discussion groups. Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

· The activities of certain groups, traditions, and communities, both historical and contemporary, in particular cities.

· The city life of prominent esoteric figures and how that city life shaped their ideas and practices.

· Particular events, meetings, lectures,  performances, happenings, protests whose urban setting featured prominently in their execution and influence.

· The mythology of the occult city, based on legend, occult symbolism, and esoteric symbolism of architecture and urban planning.

· A practical approach to working magick and ritual in the city, perhaps based on Urban Shamanism or Chaos Magick.

· Interpretations of the city and its occult power by urban fantasy authors.

· The intersections of the occult and the political through the use of ritualized protest actions, focusing on setting and urban scene.

· Though not focusing on hauntings per se, an investigation of spiritualism, mysticism and psychic practices prominent in urban settings.

· A study of how hereditary or hybridized indigenous practices survive, evolve and adapt in an urban setting.

With your submission, please include the following:

Presenter information (name, mailing and email addresses, phone number)

Type of presentation (paper, non-paper presentation, workshop,

performance, roundtable).

Note: if you are proposing a roundtable discussion, please submit info for all participants.

Title and affiliation (institution, organization, independent scholar,

or practitioner).

Proposal or abstract (not to exceed 250 words). Should include title of presentation and a clear description of the presentation’s intent, plus

any audio/visual needs. Biographical data (not to exceed 200 words).

Contact and submissions:

Please email all submissions by August 20th to:

Dr. Jason L. Winslade

DePaul University

jwinslad@depaul.edu

Conference website:

http://phoenixrising.org.gr/en/3932/call-for-papers-presentations-workshops-rituals-and-performances-mapping-the-occult-city-exploring-magick-and-esotericism-in-the-urban-utopia/

Please include “PRA Pre-Conference” in the subject line. All submissions

will be reviewed and you will be notified of a decision one week after

the deadline.

CONFERENCE: Charming Intentions – Occultism – Magic and the History of Art

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This two-day graduate conference will investigate the intersections between visual culture and the occult tradition, ranging from the material culture of ‘primitive’ animism, through medieval and Renaissance depictions of witchcraft and demonology, to the contemporary fascination with the supernatural in popular culture.

The conference aims to provide a stimulating arena for the presentation of innovative research in this field as well as to offer a vibrant and thought-provoking forum for scholarly discussion and exchange. We welcome papers from current and recent graduate students from all disciplines, provided their research engages with material, visual or symbolic aspects of magic and occultism.

Acceptable topics include, but are by no means limited to, the following areas:

* The sacred and the profane;

* The material culture of magic, ritual and sacrifice;

* Objects of totemic, apotropaeic or fetishistic character;

* Aspects of mysticism in Jewish, Christian and Islamic art and architecture;

* Satanism, witchcraft and demonology; * Sacred geometry, numerology and cosmology;

* The arcane sciences (including astrology, alchemy and the tarot game);

* Art-theoretical discussions of the spiritual, the sublime, the marvellous, the numinous and the uncanny;

* Artistic investigations of myth, fantasy and utopia;

* Visual aspects of occult movements such as Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, Theosophy, Mesmerism, Spiritism and New Age Spirituality;

* The supernatural and the spiritual in modern and contemporary art; * Occultism and magic in contemporary popular culture.

N.B.: Presentations should not exceed a maximum of 20 minutes and will be followed by a 10-minute Q&A session. The sessions will be chaired by senior scholars within the University of Cambridge’s History of Art Department. We also hope to publish selected conference papers in a book of proceedings.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to:

 charming.intentions@gmail.com

alongside a CV of 1-2 pages.

Deadline for submission is the 30th of September 2012.

All abstracts will be peer-reviewed and successful applicants will be notified about acceptance of their papers before the 15th of October 2012.

Early applications are strongly encouraged.

The Conference Committee

Josefine Baark, PhD Candidate, Homerton College Gabriel Byng, PhD Candidate, Clare College Imma Ramos, PhD Candidate, Pembroke College Daniel Zamani, PhD Candidate, Trinity College.

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CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

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Day 1: Monday, 3 December 2012

09.30 – 10.00 Registration at

History of Art Department’s Graduate Centre on 4A Trumpington Street

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10.00 – 10.05 Welcome address (Daniel Zamani & Dr Alexander Marr)

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10.05 – 11.00 Keynote Lecture

Dr Urszula Szulakowska (University of Leeds)

The Sexualisation of the Virgin Mary: Hieratic Religious Art in an Alchemical Context

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11.00 – 11.30 Coffee Break

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11.30 – 1.00 Panel 1: The Christian Middle Ages Convenor: Dr Anna Gannon

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Emily Goetsch (University of Edinburgh)

Demonising the Other”: Spanish Apocalyptic Images of Evil as a Way of Promoting Christianity in Tenth-Century Beatus Manuscripts

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Orsolya Mednyanzky (Tufts University, Medford)

Protecting the Sacred Script: A Cross in Glory in a Late Medieval Armenian Gospel Book

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Monika Winiarczyk (University of Glasgow)

‘Homo Signorum’: Looking to God or Looking to the Stars? The Role of Astrology in Medieval Christianity

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1.00 – 2.00 Lunch Break

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2.00 – 3.30 Panel 2: Islam and Hinduism Convenor: Rachel Parikh

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Anja R. Dreiser (University of Bamberg)

Magic Mirrors from the Islamic World

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Alexandra Plesa (Leiden University)

Pots That Bless: Pious Inscriptions on Samanid Pottery in Dutch Collections

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Shandra E. Lamaute (University of Edinburgh)

A Printed Islamic Amulet

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Imma Ramos (University of Cambridge)

Impurity, Auspiciousness and Power: The Tantric Transformations of Lajja Gauri at Kamakhya

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3.30 – 4.00 Coffee Break

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4.00 – 5.00 Panel 3: Early Modern Europe I Convenor: Prof. Jean Michel Massing

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Liliana Leopardi (Hobert and William Smith Colleges, NY)

Renaissance Magic Precious and Semi-Precious Stones: the Fetish as a

path to Pyschological Integrity

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Nikola Piperkov (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Et procul in tenuem ex oculis euanuit auram: Natural Magic and Divine Word in Giambologna’s Statue of Mercury

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Day 2: Tuesday, 4 December 2012

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10.00 – 11.00 Panel 4: Early Modern Europe II Convenor: Dr Alexander Marr

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Alexandra Marraccini (University of Chicago)

Open Secrets: Alchemical-Hermetic Iconography in the Ripley Scrolls

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Marthe Kretzschmar (Technische Universitaet Hamburg)

Waxwork. Aby Warburg’s “Bildzauber” between materiality and resemblance

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11.00 – 11.30 Coffee Break

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11.30 – 1.00 Panel 5: Great Britain Convenor: Josefine Baark

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Stephanie Churms (Aberystwyth University)

Drawn by the Magician’s Wand”: The Occult Culture of Revolutionary Caricature

Lauren Greer (University of Saint-Thomas, MN)

Glamour: A Dissection of John Anster Fitzgerald’s Fairyland

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Heather Carroll (University of Edinburgh)

Art not without ambition’: Lady Melbourne, the Duchess of Devonshire and Mrs. Damer as The Three Witches from Macbeth

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1.00 – 2.00 Lunch Break

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2.00 – 3.30 Panel 6: Surrealism Convenor: Dr Karolina Watras

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Daniel Zamani (University of Cambridge)

Alchemy & Empowerment in Victor Brauner’s Appropriation of the Tarot Magician

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Kristina Rapacki (Courtauld Institute, London)

Deicide, Regicide, Suicide: Bataille, Acephale and the Sovereign

Victoria Camblin (University of Cambridge)

Ritual and the Wagnerism of Acéphale (1936-1939)

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3.30 – 4.00 Coffee Break

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4.00 – 5.30 Panel 7: The 20 th Century Convenor: Elizabeth Upper

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Adele Gardener (University of Bristol)

Art, Invocation and Alchemy: The Tarot Paintings of Lady Frieda Harris

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Lisa Hanstein (Art-Historical Institute, Florence)

Unseen Spirits? Occult Aspects of Italian Futurist Art & Theory

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Judith Noble (Arts University College, Bournemouth)

Ritual and Invocation: Occultism in the Films of Maya Deren and Kenneth Anger

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5.30 – 5.35 Closing Remarks (Gabriel Byng)

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5.35 – 7.00 Wine reception

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Close of conference

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Conference University of Aberdeen: SECOND SIGHT AND PROPHECY

Conference University of Aberdeen

14-16 June 2013

 

Conference organised by the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy, and the Elphinstone Institute at the University of Aberdeen; sponsored by the Folklore Society

This interdisciplinary conference welcomes participants from a range of academic disciplines including History, Folklore, Anthropology, Divinity and Sociology whose research interests cover a wide range of topics exploring varying methods used by different cultures (both now and in the past) to look into the future and the rationale for so doing. The future has always held a fascination for humankind especially in times of tribulation and this is worthy of academic discussion in light of the changes affecting so many of us in our current global context. The role in culture of seers and prophets, by whatever name they are known, and the use of rituals, drugs and sacred sites, etc. will be examined.

Abstracts of 300 words are invited on any of the following or related topics.

These should be submitted by 15 November 2012 to the conference convenor, Dr Alex Sutherland, History Department, University of Aberdeen;

 a.m.sutherland@abdn.ac.uk mailto:a.m.sutherland@abdn.ac.uk

Papers might address:

Astrology and its rationale(s) for predicting the future.

Biblical prophecy as depicted in the arts.

Divination in any form.

English attitudes to second sight.

Healing wells.

How modern scientists have appropriated the persona of the prophet or visionary seer.

Landscape and prophecy in art.

Old Norse and later Scandinavian sources on prophecy.

Popular Catholic belief in prophecy before and after the Reformation.

Prophecy in Native American tribes.

Prophetic utterances by the courts, commoners, and the church.

Reading the future in the landscape of settlements.

Renaissance science and astrology.

Sami shamanism.

Second sight and prophecy in Scottish Gaeldom.

Second sight and prophecy in the Viking world.

Second sight in Gaelic traditions as they survived and evolved in Nova Scotian communities.

Seers and seeresses in medieval Icelandic saga literature.

The early Islamic world & its connections with astrology.

The role of prophecies, visions and dreams in poetry and allegorical tales.

The role of prophecy in the origins of Islam, in the pre-Islamic Arabian environment

The use of sites, dreams and ancestors for prophecies by indigenous peoples.

Visual and verbal imagery of natural objects as coded language for the use of entheogens to attain divine / prophetic knowledge.

Welsh prophetic poetry.

When prophecy fails.

DEMONS AND ILLNESS: THEORY AND PRACTICE FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD

 

Demons and Illness: Theory and Practice from Antiquity to the Early  Modern Period

Call for Papers

Centre for  Medical History: University of Exeter

22 – 24th   April 2013

In many near eastern traditions, demons appear as a cause of illness: most famously in the stories of possessed people cured by Christ. These traditions influenced perceptions of illness in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in later centuries but the ways in which these cultures viewed demons and illness have  received comparatively little attention. For example, who were these demons? How did they cause illness?  Why did they want to?  How did demons fit into other explanations for illness?   How could demonic illnesses be cured and how did this relate to other kinds of cure?  How far did medical or philosophical theory affect how people  responded to demonic illnesses in practice?

This conference will take a comparative approach, taking a wide geographical and  chronological sweep but confining itself to this relatively specific set of questions.  Because Jewish, Christian and Islamic ideas about demons and illness drew  on a similar heritage of ancient religious texts from New Testament times to the early modern period there is real scope to draw meaningful comparisons between the different periods and cultures.  What were the common assumptions  made by different societies? When and why did they  differ?  What was the relationship between theory and  practice?  We would welcome papers which address these issues for any period between antiquity and the early modern period, and which discuss Christian, Jewish or  Islamic traditions.

The conference is hosted by the Centre for Medical History at the University of Exeter, on April 22nd-24th,  2013. 

Please send abstracts by  15th September 2012 to the conference  organizers,

Catherine Rider and Siam Bhayro, Centre for Medical History, University of Exeter:

email  c.r.rider@exeter.ac.uk  or s.bhayro@exeter.ac.uk. 

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