Cambridge Centre for the study of Western Esotericism

Research, Reviews, Conferences

CALL FOR PAPERS CCWE CONFERENCE 2008

THIS IS A CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE SECOND CCWE CONFERENCE

to be held on Saturday 11th October 2008
in the Unitarian Memorial Church in Cambridge CB1 1JW UK

WESTERN ESOTERICISM & THE ARTS

The Association for the Study of Esotericism website http://www.aseweb.org gives the following useful definition of esotericism:

The word “esoteric” derives from the Greek esoterikos, and is a comparative form of eso, meaning “within.” Its first known mention in Greek is in Lucian’s ascription to Aristotle of having “esoteric” [inner] and “exoteric” [outer] teachings. The word later came to designate the secret doctrines said to have been taught by Pythagoras to a select group of disciples, and, in general, to any teachings designed for or appropriate to an inner circle of disciples or initiates. In this sense, the word was brought into English in 1655 by Stanley in his History of Philosophy.

Esotericism, as an academic field, refers to the study of alternative or marginalized religious movements or philosophies whose proponents in general distinguish their own beliefs, practices, and experiences from public, institutionalized religious traditions. Among areas of investigation included in the field of esotericism are alchemy, astrology, Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Kabbalah, magic, mysticism, Neoplatonism, new religious movements connected with these currents, nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century occult movements, Rosicrucianism, secret societies, and theosophy.

It is also important to consider that the major world religions have all been influenced in various ways by esotericism, and Western esotericism has influenced Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Artists in the literary, musical and visual fields have long been influenced by and involved with esoteric teachings and practices, some of these connections are well known, Botticelli and astrology, Mozart and Freemasonry, Yeats and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, but many remain less known or hidden, so that the extent and importance of these influences tends to have been underestimated or unrecognised.

Papers are invited which look at Western Esotericism and the Arts, from a variety of academic and practitioner disciplines. Please send an email of your abstract in two hundred words to Dr Sophia Wellbeloved sophia@gurdjieff-books.net

The registration fee must be received before speakers can be confirmed.

CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Reverend Dr Malcolm Guite
Chaplain of Girton College Cambridge is both poet and priest.
see his website
http://www.malcolmguite.com/links.html

The registration fee is £30.00 for the day, includes light lunch, coffee and tea student rates available. Contact: Dr Sophia Wellbeloved at sophia@gurdjieff-books.net

The Cambridge Centre for the study of Western Esotericism is independent of any academic or esoteric communities, the co-ordinators share an interest in the need for a wider dialogue between scholars and practitioners in the field of Western Esotericism and in the establishment of a secular space in which an interdisciplinary network can thrive (see people).

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Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

June 26, 2008 at 9:40 am

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